artistic-annihilation:

soloontherocks:

estrellatricotada:

soloontherocks:

things I want to see:

  • tattooed young Hera who redefines what it means to be feminine (ex: x )
  • Apollo enjoying counterculture modern music that isn’t what your grandaddy listens to because…

These are all far too thoughtful and progressive for the Greek gods, who were famously a bunch of psychotic, murderous rapists and torture-lovers

persimmonskies:

skyqueen3:

poppypicklesticks:

humanslothking:

I’m all for LGBT rights but this is quite ridiculous 

That’s right, shit all over the military, that’s really going to make us look great and make straight people want to support us, you horrid harpy 

Unless they’re the ally hating type I can’t see this doing much good.

What the actual fuck?

Achievement Unlocked: Spoiled Brat

qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race. qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.
sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.
maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree
xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.
For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race.

qthewetsprocket:

whowasntthere:

notcuddles:

ostealjewelry:

mybroomstickcloset:

Fairy rings occupy a prominent place in European folklore as the location of gateways into elfin kingdoms, or places where elves gather and dance. According to the folklore, a fairy ring appears when a fairy, pixie, or elf appears. It will disappear without trace in less than five days, but if an observer waits for the elf to return to the ring, he or she may be able to capture it. They are soooooo beautiful!

fairy rings are usually caused by decaying organic matter, generally a tree stump. many types of fungi have symbiotic relationships with tree roots and mushrooms are the fruiting bodies of such fungus. So if a huge old tree was cut down, you’ll often find fairy rings. they can last for years and years as the earth  reabsorbs all the nutrients left behind by the beautiful tree.

sorry, didn’t mean to crush dreams - but i have a degree in horticulture and i was really excited when i first learned this.

maybe fairies and fungi are joining together to mourn the loss of the tree

xo

NO BUT FINDING OUT ABOUT WHY FAIRY RINGS EXIST IS ALSO REALLY COOL.

From a writer’s perspective, it’s even more interesting to find out why they exist on a horticultural level, because it opens up a whole realm of fictional possibilities. Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

For example, doesn’t that just essentially make this a tree grave? And if folklore has taught us anything, it’s that “fairies” and other spirits usually occupy trees, or have them as their life force. And that’s to say nothing of the folklore of trees being spirits in and of themselves, or kitsunes that live in tree hollows, or dryads, etc., etc.. So, if it’s disrespectful or feels like a slight to step on human graves, wouldn’t that logic transfer to stepping inside the Fairy Circle, AKA, the tree’s grave? It’s essentially giving more fuel to the story, not detracting from it, in my humble opinion!

Science doesn’t have to invalidate mythology or fiction, no more than mythology or fiction invalidates science.

Huge inspiration for my probably-never-to-be-completed fantasy story featuring a Fairy-like race.

(via alittlebriton)

holding-the-rope:

shadowpassion:

restlesslyaspiring:

pearlsandink:

Men’s Rights Activists.

OH MY GOD THIS IS A PERFECT REPRESENTATION


I will never stop my assault on tumblr and feminismYou will never silence the voice of men, never.You can not gain equality unless you give it.Ps? Getting kicked in the testicles is scientifically more painful than giving birth. So you can fuck yourselves.I will never give up until every tumblr feminist is gone, withering away in the dirt. The egalitarian master race sends their regards.Feminism is outdated.

Guys look fresh men tears

Why do MRAs always give me the impression that they’ve never had consensual sex with a woman in their lives? holding-the-rope:

shadowpassion:

restlesslyaspiring:

pearlsandink:

Men’s Rights Activists.

OH MY GOD THIS IS A PERFECT REPRESENTATION


I will never stop my assault on tumblr and feminismYou will never silence the voice of men, never.You can not gain equality unless you give it.Ps? Getting kicked in the testicles is scientifically more painful than giving birth. So you can fuck yourselves.I will never give up until every tumblr feminist is gone, withering away in the dirt. The egalitarian master race sends their regards.Feminism is outdated.

Guys look fresh men tears

Why do MRAs always give me the impression that they’ve never had consensual sex with a woman in their lives? holding-the-rope:

shadowpassion:

restlesslyaspiring:

pearlsandink:

Men’s Rights Activists.

OH MY GOD THIS IS A PERFECT REPRESENTATION


I will never stop my assault on tumblr and feminismYou will never silence the voice of men, never.You can not gain equality unless you give it.Ps? Getting kicked in the testicles is scientifically more painful than giving birth. So you can fuck yourselves.I will never give up until every tumblr feminist is gone, withering away in the dirt. The egalitarian master race sends their regards.Feminism is outdated.

Guys look fresh men tears

Why do MRAs always give me the impression that they’ve never had consensual sex with a woman in their lives?

holding-the-rope:

shadowpassion:

restlesslyaspiring:

pearlsandink:

Men’s Rights Activists.

OH MY GOD THIS IS A PERFECT REPRESENTATION

I will never stop my assault on tumblr and feminism

You will never silence the voice of men, never.

You can not gain equality unless you give it.

Ps? Getting kicked in the testicles is scientifically more painful than giving birth. So you can fuck yourselves.

I will never give up until every tumblr feminist is gone, withering away in the dirt. The egalitarian master race sends their regards.

Feminism is outdated.

Guys look fresh men tears

Why do MRAs always give me the impression that they’ve never had consensual sex with a woman in their lives?

(via chamberofguph)

fanboyin:

Stephen King being Stephen King


*Stephen King being an arseholeCorrected that for you fanboyin:

Stephen King being Stephen King


*Stephen King being an arseholeCorrected that for you fanboyin:

Stephen King being Stephen King


*Stephen King being an arseholeCorrected that for you

fanboyin:

Stephen King being Stephen King

*Stephen King being an arsehole

Corrected that for you

(via wilwheaton)

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Kumail Nanjiani

AmericanForeignPolicy.gif

(via chamberofguph)

hello you beautiful baby
booksandbeers:

now officially a dogblog

 puppieeeeeeeessss booksandbeers:

now officially a dogblog

 puppieeeeeeeessss booksandbeers:

now officially a dogblog

 puppieeeeeeeessss

booksandbeers:

now officially a dogblog

puppieeeeeeeessss

(via chamberofguph)

wilwheaton:

callmeagentv:

Dammit, Wheaton! 

also…IG: @callmeagent_v

I don’t know what’s going on here, but I’m sure Lil’ Wil approves.